AUTISM AND ASPERGERS

Differences between Autism and Asperger’s Syndrome

What distinguishes asperger’s syndrome from autism is the severity of the symptoms and the absence of language delays. There has been a lot of debate about the nature of asperger’s syndrome is a type of autism, but without many of the debilitating symptoms. There are many differences between what most people think of when they imagine an autistic child and one that suffers from asperger’s syndrome. There are some of the basic differences between autism and asperger’s syndrome; which is:

  1. A child who is typically autistic will show severe lapses in the development of language. A high percentage of autistic children may never develop language skills at all. With a child or an adolescent who has asperger’s syndrome, language skills are usually not affected at all and in fact can be above average. A child with asperger’s syndrome can show impaired social development that may lead to a lack of language usage, but the actual development of the language itself is on par with other children of the same age.
  2. A second way to differentiate asperger’s disease from classic autism is the cognitive abilities of asperger’s children. Most kids that have asperger’s show normal or even above average cognitive ability in classroom settings and on I.Q. tests. This extends into the later years of development too. However, children with classic autism show cognitive impairments that usually do not improve with age.
  3. A third and major difference between kids with autism and asperger’s is the way the two interact socially. In most cases, although there are variances since each child with autism and each child with asperger’s reacts differently, a child who is autistic can sometimes come across as being cocky or not really caring about children around them. However children with asperger’s syndrome in most cases want to be social but are just very, very awkward. They tend to be too formal in social situations, and they are thought to not show empathy to other children. They may also appear to have no knowledge of social rules and proper mannerisms. They can also show almost complete lack of eye contact, which many regard as a lack of interest in being social, but it is more out of awkwardness than a lack of wanting to be social.
  4. A final way that you can tell if a child has asperger’s syndrome and not traditional autism is the way an asperger’s syndrome child becomes obsessed with things. The subject of the obsession can range something like sports statistics to obscure things. This obsessive behavior also has an impact on the child’s socialization. They tend to only want to talk about whatever their current obsession is with other people, including kids their own age. This can add to the awkward social interaction that is common for those with asperger’s syndrome.

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:: AUTISM TREATMENT

Autism and Aspergers Cure

To be more effective and potential in treatment, Chinese Master using traditional medical systems originates from China 5000 years ago. The effectiveness and good result of Neuron Acupuncture Treatment for autism and asperger’s syndrome has been proven by many of Chinese physician in the world. Chinese Master is one of them. He shows the good result in Malaysia. Many of autism patients in Malaysian had meet him for autism and asperger’s syndrome treatment. Some of the autism patients also come from others country to meet Chinese Master for autism and asperger’s syndrome treatment.

Even acupuncture Chinese Master also using secret herbs that plant in The Tole Garden. Chinese Master has to confirm the herbs quality that provided to his autism and asperger’s syndrome patients. Good quality herbs can help to treat the autism more efficiency. Herbs are generally safe and increases strengthen and tone the body’s system. The correct herbal therapy may be an important part of an autism treatment, but should only be used under the Chinese Master that is an experienced provider knowledgeable in herbal.

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